Does Snickers still satisfy? Big Brother doesn't want you to find out

Friday, January 3, 2014
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

Beginning this year, millions of vending machines are required to display calorie information. 

The regulation is part of the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as ObamaCare.

Vending machine companies that operate 20 or more machines are the only ones affected, but there are more than 10,000 of those companies operating in the U.S.

The idea of the calorie count requirement is that it will better inform consumers about the product they're purchasing and maybe change their purchase, thereby resulting in lower health expenses over time.

Julie Gunlock of the Independent Women's Forum and its "Culture of Alarmism" project doubts consumers will change their minds on which snacks they want to purchase.

"It's really interesting," says Gunlock. "There actually have been some studies on this, which makes me shake my head sometimes at the things that people actually study."

She relates that a teenage student in a Seattle School District wrote in a school newspaper, which went viral, that she buys a pack of cookies if she's nervous about a test.

"And she was saying how absurd it is that, as a 16-year-old girl, she isn't responsible enough to make these decisions," Gunlock explains.

Gunlock

Gunlock adds that she is concerned about the cost of complying with this regulation, as the FDA estimates it will run $24 to $26 million.

In its report on the subject, CNN shows that a Snickers bar contains upwards of 300 calories, whereas a small package of Fig Newtons contains 190 calories.

Meanwhile, OneNewsNow did look up the nutrition label for Fig Newtons. Using information from CalorieCount.About.Com, OneNewsNow found that even though the two bars of fruit and cake do offer less calories, fat and carbohydrates than Snickers, a Snickers bar does contain more protein – if that is something you want to include in your diet.

On a related note, Livestrong.com wrote an article in 2011 saying that Fig Newtons contain added sugars "that are not healthy." Livestrong.com also warned that, because figs are high in fiber, eating a large portion of Fig Newtons may cause constipation, something that affects 15 percent of the population according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Is it fair to blame President Obama for much of the racial tension now in America?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Reid asks FBI to probe threat of Russian election tampering
1 killed, several injured in south Georgia school bus crash
Slain NM girl's relatives mystified over mom's role
Hurricane watch issued as storm nears Hawaii's Big Island
1 dead, 4 hurt in highway shootout; bullet holes cover SUV
Takata troubles worsen as truck explodes, kills Texas woman
Clinton aide leaving husband after another sexting scandal
Mylan launching cheaper, generic version of EpiPen

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Kansas State University gun policy to allow campus-wide concealed carry
Just in time: Trans-locker rooms shot down
Clemson University forbids man from praying, calls it 'solicitation'
Hillary’s plantation
PC talking points about immigration don’t square with the facts

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Investor creates platform for charitable giving

A former Wall Street investor has created a new charity-funding platform.