Sprigg: Jump in lesbianism disproves gay gene theory

Saturday, November 17, 2012
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

A spokesman for the Family Research Council says statistics from recent studies and surveys undermine the longtime claim of the homosexual community of the existence of a supposed "gay gene."

A recent Gallup survey estimates the lesbian, homosexual, bisexual and transgender population in the U.S. at 3.4 percent. The lead author was Gary Gates of the UCLA School of Law's Williams Institute, who released a study a year ago averaging five recent surveys that reflected about the same as the Gallup study. In fact, those studies ranged from 1.7 percent to 6 percent.

Peter Sprigg of the Family Research Council tells OneNewsNow homosexuals estimate their numbers to be 10-20 percent, but the studies prove that to be false. Sprigg points to one part of the Gallup study that is especially important.

Sprigg, Peter (FRC)"There has been a significant growth in the number of women who identify as lesbian, bisexual or transgender -- a much larger growth than the number of men," he says.

"In 1994, there were twice as many homosexual men as women, but now homosexual women actually outnumber the homosexual men."

During that time span, the number of homosexual men has increased by 18 percent while the number of women who identify as such has gone up 157 percent.

"I think that that suggests that there are strong cultural factors at work and that, at least indirectly, undermines the whole theory of a gay gene," Spriggs tells OneNewsNow. "If there were a gay gene, we would never see evolution taking place at that rapid a pace; so something else must be at work."

Sprigg believes the increase to be due to cultural factors. But that influence, he says, does not get a lot of publicity "because it undermines the theory that people are either born gay or born straight, and that there is no in between."

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