'Sweeping' changes 'a major problem'

Thursday, November 29, 2012
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

A Pennsylvania pro-family activist is concerned about the prospect of parents in the state no longer being allowed to spank their children.

A commission set up by the Pennsylvania Legislature after Jerry Sandusky's molestation arrest last year says "sweeping" changes to state law are needed. Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, is currently serving a state prison sentence for sexually abusing children.

The Pennsylvania Task Force on Child Protection says the state should change how child abuse cases are handled, revamp how child abuse crimes are investigated, and improve training for those responsible for child welfare. The definition of "perpetrator" would be expanded greatly, and penalties would be harsher for people who do not report abuse.

Gramley, Diane (AFA of Pennsylvania)While Diane Gramley, president of the American Family Association of Pennsylvania, agrees that children need to be protected from molestation and abuse, she feels the task force is going too far.

"There may need to be changes made, or maybe we just need to enforce existing laws better," she suggests. "The situation with Sandusky -- that main problem was at Penn State. I think that needs to be dealt with on that level, and I don't think they need to be looking at sweeping changes to the entire state law. I think that's going to be a major problem if they do that."

Gramley is particularly troubled that the group is recommending that the state eliminate a requirement that children have to experience severe pain in order for something to be classified as abuse under the law.

"Does that mean that a parent will not be able to discipline their child? Will a parent not be able to spank their child, or even smack their hand if the child is doing something wrong?" the activist wonders. "I see parental rights being walked all over if this isn't done very carefully."

Overall, Gramley is concerned that Pennsylvania will follow Delaware, which has already outlawed spanking. She intends to express her concerns to conservative members of the state legislature.

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Who won the first presidential debate Monday night?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

  World leaders mourn Peres, praise him as a man of peace
  Wells Fargo claws back part of CEO, other executive's salary
  Filmmaker Michael Moore says theater won't allow his show
  Cedar Rapids fends off flood damage with temporary barriers
  Sheriff: Man linked to 4 Ohio slayings can't name 1st victim
FBI head defends immunity for Clinton aide
More Charlotte protesters face charges
Prosecutor: No federal charges in police killing in Memphis

LATEST FROM THE WEB

AP-GfK Poll: Voters more confident in Trump's health
FBI doc dump on email case reveals role of 'confidential' Clinton aide
200 reasons why Hillary should not be president
Black church merges with predominantly white multi-site church in NC as tensions loom in Charlotte
The real reason for the Charlotte riots

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Retraction missing from apology

Two and a Half Men co-star Angus T. Jones has been in the media spotlight the past few days for his negative comments about the TV program. Though he has apologized for his comments, an analyst points out that he did not recant his proclamation about the show's crude content.