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Seven jobs in jeopardy because Christians sat out 2012 election, says AFA VP

Charlie Butts   (OneNewsNow.com) Thursday, April 24, 2014

American Family Association has issued a wake-up call for Christians to stand for their faith and participate in elections. 

AFA issued an "Action Alert" this week pointing to seven career choices that are diminishing for Christians because of lawsuits designed to promote homosexuality. They range from photographers to counselors to broadcasters.

Smith

People in those fields are paying a price for standing on their faith.

The bottom line is that elections have consequences. says Buddy Smith, American Family Association executive vice president.

He points out that approximately 12 million born-again Christians were not registered to vote in the 2012 General Election, and 26 million were registered but didn't take the time to cast a ballot.

"And so that left 38 million Christian votes left on the table," Smith observes.

All of this is happening during a time of serious culture change in our nation, and the AFA spokesman warns that Christians can no longer sit out elections.

"We need new bold and courageous leaders in our country who will stand for faith and religious expression and liberty," says Smith. "And so Christians need to be bold and stand firm."

The church has been bullied into silence, he alleges, and that will worsen unless Christians decide to be "the salt and light in our culture that we need to be." 


Editor's Note: The American Family Association is the parent organization of the American Family News Network, which operates OneNewsNow.com.


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