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Education

Global warming makes teaching difficult

Bob Kellogg   (OneNewsNow.com) Wednesday, November 28, 2012

A conservative education analyst is warning about the dangers behind the push to teach more global-warming propaganda in America's public schools. 

In one example, Laurence Peters, in an article for Education Week, uses Hurricane Sandy to argue students need to know more about supposed "climate change." Predicting gloom and doom, Peters calls for the need to prepare a new generation of students to reinvent institutional mechanisms in order to live within safe planetary boundaries.

Neal McCluskey of the Cato Institute says such overstatements concern parents.

McCluskey, Neal (Cato Institute)"People who want the public to accept that climate change is a dire, present threat will tend to overstate the case, and when you see overstatement like that it makes people say I don't want this being taught to my kids as fact," McCluskey tells OneNewsNow.

He says the issue is so contentious that it is hard to rationally discuss the topic in schools.

"Because nobody wants their kids being indoctrinated one way or the other," he says. "And so if they're taught one thing and they disagree with it, they get very angry and say stop teaching that. And the result is that most teachers are going to avoid any contentious issues and, therefore, most schools are going to avoid contentious issues, and the kids are going to learn nothing about them."

McCluskey says parents have a legitimate reason to be afraid that their children are going to be taught something as fact when it is not at all established as such.


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