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Your bias is showing: Ted Cruz ‘long-winded,’ but Wendy Davis a ‘folk hero’

Russ Jones   (OneNewsNow.com) Friday, September 27, 2013

A media watchdog group is criticizing the double standard it sees in how the mainstream media reported on lengthy political speeches by two Texas politicians who have been in the national spotlight recently.

U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) on Tuesday and Wednesday spent more than 21 straight hours on the Senate floor making his case to his Senate colleagues and the American people for de-funding of ObamaCare. Most mainstream media outlets criticized the Texas senator's speech.

Cruz's talk – not technically a filibuster – got bombarded with negative reports by the big three networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC). Scott Whitlock, senior news analyst for Media Research Center, says those networks derided the conservative uprising against ObamaCare, mocking the freshman senator and calling his speech a "bizarre, long-winded protest" against funding the healthcare law.

“Though they’re actually covering Ted Cruz this time, their response to ObamaCare and all the problems with ObamaCare – other than what Ted Cruz said – has been largely to ignore it,” he reports. “They’ve ignored the problems with implementation; they’ve ignored the problems with the one-year delay of the mandate.”

Media Research Center

That coverage, Whitlock says, stands in stark contrast to how the networks hyped Texas Democratic state senator Wendy Davis in her pro-abortion filibuster back in June, calling her a "folk hero" and her performance "epic."

“They focused on her shoes; they did a lot of coverage about that – all the sort of juicy little angles,” he describes, adding the media reports were “very supportive of what she was doing.”

“[They] called her ‘a political star.’ CBS said ‘a national political star is born.’ CNN asked: ‘A Democrat in the governor’s mansion? Unthinkable a week ago, a ‘maybe’ today.’”

Cruz's marathon talk, while no means the longest ever, ranks among the longest continuous speeches in the history of the U.S. Senate.

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