Foreign policy debate an opportunity for Romney

Tuesday, October 9, 2012
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

A senior Army strategist and Pentagon advisor says Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney will have plenty of ammunition when he debates President Obama on foreign policy next week.

In order to bolster his foreign policy credentials, the former Massachusetts governor made a major foreign policy speech Monday at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia. The GOP presidential hopeful said the risk of conflict in the Middle East has grown under President Barack Obama's leadership, and that it is time to change course in the region.

Romney is calling for the U.S. to take a more assertive role in Syria. He also wants new conditions on aid to Egypt and would impose tighter sanctions on Iran.

Lt. Col. Bob Maginnis (USA-Ret.) is senior fellow for national security at the Family Research Council. He says thanks to the alleged "Arab Spring" supported by the Obama administration over the last couple of years, the Middle East is more dangerous than when Obama took office.

Maginnis, Bob"They were trying to encourage a democratic takeover of Egypt, failing to recognize that that democratic takeover would be by Islamists who would then use that opportunity to radically change the direction of that country and, as a result, would hurt the United States," the Pentagon advisor summarizes.

Maginnis adds that Obama's policy of unilateral nuclear disarmament has also been problematic. "I think the bottom line is he wants to reduce our nuclear arsenal well below what is safe," he states.

The FRC spokesman also says there is no question that Obama's foreign policy is ideologically driven. He believes it will be interesting to see what the Romney camp does to challenge Obama on his policies.

The next presidential debate will take place Tuesday evening (9:00 p.m. Eastern), October 16, at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York. The topic of that town meeting format is foreign and domestic policy.

Debate #1 showed 'stark contrast'

A political analyst and former U.S. congressman believes Romney's recent debate performance is a major reason the presidential race has tightened in Colorado.

In 2008 Barack Obama won Colorado by a whopping nine points over John McCain -- and in May of this year, polls showed the president up by an average of six points over Mitt Romney. But a recent RealClearPolitics compilation of polls shows the president with a mere half-percentage point advantage.

Beauprez, Bob (former CO congressman)Bob Beauprez is a former Colorado congressman who attended last week's debate in Denver.

"I think given [his] performance -- and especially that it happened right here -- I think is a big advantage for Romney," he tells OneNewsNow. "... I think it bodes well for his chance to carry Colorado, and I expect a whole lot of other swing states were watching too."

Beauprez sees a very clear difference between the two candidates.

"[I saw] somebody who's maybe a good campaigner, and the other guy who is somebody who's ready to be president -- a stark contrast in leadership style and [in] capability," says the former lawmaker.

"Mitt Romney approached it like a business CEO would -- and Barack Obama was still out there spinning like a politician, just pandering to his constituency."

Beauprez believes the momentum is now very much on Romney's side.

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Why is the first Trump-Clinton debate such a big deal to voters?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

  Latest: Late updates following 1st presidential debate
Spectators from Australia to Japan react to debate
Parting shots: Trump hits Hillary on stamina; she pounces in retort
Reaction around the world to 1st Trump-Clinton debate
Clinton, Trump battle fiercely over taxes, race, terror
Latest: Updates from conclusion of 1st presidential debate
AP fact check: Clinton on debt-free college
Clinton accuses Trump of 'hiding something' in taxes
Latest: Updates from the 1st presidential debate
Latest: NAACP rally against police shooting hits streets
AP fact check: Clinton on jobs
Protest held in Columbus over fatal police shooting of teen

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Trump holds back on Clintons' mistreatment of women
Who won the night? Debate recap
Clinton, Trump go head to head in high stakes presidential debate
Trump v. Clinton round 1: No discussion of Clinton Foundation, Immigration, private server
From the spin room: Hillary is a phony

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Military man unqualified for office?

A retired Army colonel who served with the elite Special Forces -- and who is now running for Congress -- is being accused by his Democratic congressional opponent of being unqualified to serve in Congress.