U.N. treaty fails in Senate

Monday, December 3, 2012
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

Several pro-family and parental rights groups are relieved to see the U.S. Senate fail to ratify a United Nations treaty concerning the disabled.

The vote on the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities was largely along party lines. Prior to the vote, Utah Senator Mike Lee (R) rose to argue against the bill, citing concerns over possible relinquishment of sovereignty of the United States to a U.N. body.

"I've also heard from parents of disabled children who are concerned that this treaty will threaten their rights as parents to determine the best education, treatment and care for their disabled children," he cited.

Lee also pointed out that the United States is already the world leader in terms of providing for the needs of the disabled, so it does not need a United Nations panel as a forum in order to be a model to other nations looking to improve their laws.

It would have taken the votes of 66 of the 99 members present to ratify the treaty.

"On this vote, the yeas are 61; the nays are 38," the Senate president announced. "Two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of the ratification is not agreed to."

Groups like the Home School Legal Defense Association and Joni and Friends strongly opposed the treaty. Susan Yoshihara of the Catholic Family & Human Rights Institute warned OneNewsNow in September that ratification of the measure would have opened the door for more abortions.

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