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Israel settles for 'weakest response' to U.N. vote

Chad Groening   (OneNewsNow.com) Wednesday, December 05, 2012

A U.S.-born Israeli author and former politician thinks the financial punishment Israel has announced against the Palestinians over their successful bid for statehood is "the weakest response" the Jewish state could have made.

Israel soundly rejected the United Nations endorsement of an independent state of Palestine after the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly last week to support the statehood initiative. Israel announced it would start drawing up plans to build thousands of settlement homes in the disputed territory.

Rubin, DavidDavid Rubin is the former mayor of the Israeli town of Shiloh and author of The Islamic Tsunami: Israel and America in the Age of Obama. He successfully predicted that Israel would also retaliate by pledging to withhold more than $100 million in tax dollars earmarked for the Palestinian territory, which needs the money to pay for electricity provided by the Israelis.

"They owe the electrical company millions of dollars," Rubin reports. "So, Israel would deduct the money that is owed to the electrical authority from some of the tax money that Israel passes along to the Palestinian Authority each month. That would be the weakest response."

Rubin believes a far stronger response was called for.

"The strongest response would be for Israel to immediately declare Israeli sovereignty over Judea and Samaria -- the areas that the world knows as the West Bank," he offers. "And I think that would be the proper and right thing to do ... legally and historically and politically."

Israel has already been criticized by the Obama administration for moving ahead with the settlements.

Canada's retaliation

A Canadian pro-family leader is pleased that the Conservative government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper has taken strong steps in the wake of the U.N. vote on Palestinian statehood.

John Baird, Canada's foreign affairs minister, recently recalled senior diplomats from Israel, the West Bank and United Nations missions to assess the implications of the U.N. General Assembly vote to recognize the Palestinians as a non-member observer state.

Baird asserts Canada will review its whole relationship with the Palestinian Authority, as he is deeply disappointed by the U.N. vote in which Canada joined Israel, the United States and a few other countries in voting "no." He believes the only way to peace in the Middle East is through negotiations -- not through what he calls "unilateral actions."

Brian Rushfeldt, president of Canada Family Action (CFA), is proud of Baird's response.

"This is not about an anti-Palestinian situation; it's about doing the right thing -- that Israel does have the right to exist and not try to force them to co-exist in a two-party state and have their land taken over," Rushfeldt comments. "I think if we took a poll today, the majority of Canadians by far would support what the prime minister and foreign affairs minister has done."

Baird deems the General Assembly decision an "impediment to peace," as Rushfeldt notes a growing anti-U.N. sentiment in Canada.

"I think this vote on the Palestinian issue actually has awakened a lot of Canadians to how absolutely ludicrous and dangerous the U.N. actually is as an organization," the CFA president offers.

Rushfeldt now urges Canada to question whether sending any tax dollars to the U.N. is the proper thing to do.


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