Obama OK with voter ID in Kenya, but not in U.S.

Friday, July 5, 2013
 | 
Russ Jones (OneNewsNow.com)

A conservative analyst finds it odd that during his recent African tour, President Barack Obama announced support for a citizen ID program in Kenya - yet considers a similar effort in the United States to be racially motivated.

While President Obama and his family toured the African continent earlier in the week, the White House released a Fact Sheet that promotes a $53 million U.S. taxpayer-funded program in Kenya that assists young people to "obtain National identification cards, a prerequisite to voter registration."

Robert Knight, senior fellow of the American Civil Rights Union, says many who seek to defend against voter fraud in the U.S. are perplexed with Obama's inconsistencies in regards to the voter ID issue.

Knight, Robert (ACRU)"The irony is that the president is using taxpayer dollars to promote something in Africa that he is actively suppressing in the United States, and calling people names who are promoting that very thing," Knight remarks to OneNewsNow.

The White House Fact Sheet states that in advance of Kenya's March 2013 general elections, the Kenyan campaign - known as "My ID My Life" - helped 500,000 youth obtain national identification cards and carried out a successful nationwide campaign with Kenyan civic organizations to elicit peace pledges from all presidential aspirants.

Knight points out what he considers a glaring inconsistency. "This is an administration, you understand, whose Justice Department struck down voter ID laws in South Carolina and Texas just before the 2012 elections," he notes, "and has said over and over that states that are trying to require photo ID are motivated solely by political bias."

In August 2012, White House press secretary Jay Carney described Obama's view of voter registration, saying: "And on the voter ID case, I can tell you that, as you know, this administration believes it should be easier for eligible citizens to vote - to register and vote. We should not be imposing unnecessary obstacles or barriers to voter participation."

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