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House immigration bill in October? Only time will tell ...

Chad Groening   (OneNewsNow.com) Wednesday, September 11, 2013

A border enforcement advocacy organization believes House Republicans will bring amnesty legislation to the floor next month.

After refusing to take up the Senate immigration bill before the August recess, some House leaders have indicated a desire to bring the divisive issue up next month. At the same time, however, some senior GOP aides in the House are predicting immigration isn’t likely to come up for months, having been pushed back by the debate over military action in Syria and an anticipated face-off with the president over the budget and debt ceiling.

Ira Mehlman, a spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), isn’t buying it. He says amnesty proponents like Congressman Paul Ryan (R-Wisconsin) want to get some kind of immigration bill passed in order to get it into the conference committee with the Senate bill.

Mehlman, Ira (Federation for American Immigration Reform)"Once these leaders get behind closed doors in a conference committee, then they can hammer out any kind of agreement that they want,” he tells OneNewsNow. “And [when they do] it's likely to be something much, much closer to the Senate version of immigration policy than it is to what most House members want. So there's a real danger there."

Mehlman is concerned that an amnesty-laden bill hammered out by conference committee would be hard to stop when it goes back to the full House for approval.

"Obviously the House membership does have the ability to simply say no,” he acknowledges, “but all the Democrats in the House would vote for it. And it would only take a relative handful of Republicans breaking rank and voting with them to get this passed in the House."

For that reason, Mehlman is hopeful no immigration reform bill will be passed in the House this year.

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has hinted it might be difficult to find time to consider immigration legislation next month. The House is in session only 14 days in October; and fewer than 40 working days in total remain before the year ends.

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