Voters urged to vocalize after the veto

Monday, January 11, 2016
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

protest outside Planned ParenthoodIn the wake of a presidential veto last week, pro-life Americans are being encouraged to focus on the upcoming federal election and vote into office those who will defend the lives of the unborn.

Last week President Obama vetoed the reconciliation bill passed by both houses of Congress. That legislation would have dropped key components of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. ObamaCare), including the fee in policies to pay for others' abortions, and temporarily stopped most of the federal dollars going to Planned Parenthood.

Grossu

Arina Grossu of the Family Research Council tells OneNewsNow that now is the time for the public to let President Obama know how they feel about his veto action.

"He did it very quietly, but it's not going to get past the public who care about unborn babies and everyone who's been so disappointed and astonished at all of the findings of Planned Parenthood," she predicts. "And so I think that they need to make their voice heard and their displeasure known."

Jim Sedlak of American Life League says the president's veto wasn't unexpected. "But what it demonstrates against is that in the United States you can buy the White House," he emphasizes.

"Planned Parenthood spent millions of dollars to get Obama elected the first time [and] spent millions more to be him elected the second time – and Obama feels that he owes Planned Parenthood."

Sedlak, Jim (American Life League)That needs to stop, says Sedlak. "It's time that the American people to elect people of ethical value who will do what's right," he says, "[people] who will follow the lead of the American people and who will stop the slaughter of our children."

Grossu agrees, saying the only sure way to get the reconciliation bill passed and signed into law is to make ensure pro-life candidates have the majority in Congress and occupy the White House.

"So I hope that this is a good push for the general public to continue to fight for a pro-life president and make sure that we rally around whoever the candidate is and vote," she offers, "because anyone else is better than Hillary Clinton – any of the Republican candidates.

GOP presidential hopefuls have vowed to defund Planned Parenthood should they be elected to the Oval Office.

A veto override vote is set for January 22, but the two-thirds' vote necessary is not expected.

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