Women may want female president, just not Hillary

Friday, February 12, 2016
 | 
Steve Jordahl (OneNewsNow.com)

Bernie S. supporterWomen are "feeling the Bern" sort of speak in the Democratic primary and, as a consequence, so is Hillary Clinton.

Sen. Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire women's vote by 53-46 percent in that state's Feb. 9 primary. Young women in particular went for the self-described Democratic socialist over Clinton, a self-described feminist.

In fact, 69 percent of women under age 45 backed Sanders and an astounding 82 percent of those under 30.

Those figures surprise conservative icon Phyllis Schlafly of Eagle Forum, who says there's nothing about Sanders that's attractive to women.

"I don't know that anything appeals to them," she tells OneNewsNow. "Maybe they just don't like Hillary."

Schlafly observes that Sanders' appeal may have more to do with discontent among grassroots voters versus the so-called "establishment" candidates.

Hillary C. testifying"They've given us a whole series of losers," she says of the establishment, "and we're fed up."

Clinton's appeal to women hasn't been helped by feminist icon Gloria Steinem and Medeleine Albright, a former secretary of state.

Days before the primary, Albright suggested that there's a "special place in Hell" for women who didn't support Clinton, an obvious appeal for women voters to support the female candidate. 

Albright has used a similar line for years to push a feminist view, and after the primary political, observers and the media quipped that there must be many New Hampshire women headed there for voting for Sanders.

Steinem, a pioneer of radical feminism, suggested that young girls are backing Sanders so they can meet boys who are also supporting him.

"This has almost had the opposite effect on young women," says Hadley Heath Manning of the Independent Women's Forum. "Making them angry that their vote would almost be a presumption for Hillary Clinton only because of her gender."

She says Millennials of her generation are smarter than that, understanding that a female will eventually be elected president but Clinton is not how to get there.

"We believe there will be other candidates," she predicts. "There will be other opportunities."

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