College athletes being pressured to abort – or else

Thursday, March 15, 2018
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

pregnant woman handPregnant college students who want to give their children life rather than aborting them have rights – and administrators need to be educated on those rights.

Under Title IX, student athletes who become pregnant are protected from discrimination. But many students and campus coordinators don't know that, which may be why some student-athletes feel they were pressured into abortions to retain scholarships. An initiative called Pregnant on Campus cites examples (in a Christian Post article) involving Title IX coordinators at Clemson University and University of Memphis, and a four-time Olympic gold medalist.

Matt Lamb is with Students for Life, which sponsors Pregnant on Campus. He maintains that students and campus officials need an education.

"... Unfortunately, some Title IX coordinators – whose job is to enforce Title IX, which is [designed] to protect equal access laws and protect the rights of students – either don't know or choose to ignore those laws," he says.

Lamb says his group has incidents on record – including this one:

"One school tried to take away the financial aid of one of their students [when she] missed a final exam because [she was] giving birth in a delivery room. And schools have to accommodate pregnant students just like [they have to accommodate students who] get really sick in the middle of the semester – they have to work with you to figure out how you can complete that semester, [how] keep your financial aid. They can't discriminate against you just because you're pregnant."

Students for Life suggests that students, school administrators, and Title IX coordinators become familiar with the law and enforce it. The group also points out that the NCAA allows a special red-shirt season for athletes who are pregnant.

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