Parents win over school-based pornography

Thursday, September 20, 2018
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

Students on laptopThe persistence of a small group of parents in a Colorado school district has paid off – and now the children in their schools won't stumble across graphic sexual content in their school curriculum.

Parents in the Cherry Creek School District fought for two years to have the district end services with EBSCO Information Services, a firm that embeds pornography in its academic databases – which is the reason why the National Center on Sexual Exploitation placed the firm on its "Dirty Dozen List" in 2017 and 2018.

NCOSE reports that "in its advertising for schools, [EBSCO] promises 'fast access to curriculum-appropriate content.' However, its Explora, Science Reference Center, Literary Reference Center, and other products, provide easy access to hardcore pornography sites and extremely graphic sexual content. Innocent searches provide pornographic results."

Earlier this month – after hearing about EBSCO from angry parents since September 2016 and working with the company to resolve the matter – officials with Cherry Creek School District decided to cancel their contract with the database service. Senior counsel Matt Heffron of the Thomas More Society, which represented those parents, credits them for persevering, despite hostile treatment from the school board.

"At one point, in fact, the superintendent of schools had contacted the police because the parents 'had the audacity' of [revealing what was on] the children's website at a school board meeting," the attorney explains. "And the superintendent contacted the police saying that [the parents] were violating obscenity laws."

Heffron says what this "handful" of parents did should inspire parents around the U.S. to examine the educational materials to which their children are being exposed. "This really, I think, is somewhat inspirational because these parents, to a great extent ...really experienced a lot of hostile treatment – and they didn't give up," he emphasizes.

EBSCO provides materials to more than 55,000 schools nationwide. The pornographic content cannot be blocked with filters because the company's databases are enclosed and not part of the Internet.

According to KUSA in Denver, other Colorado districts dropped EBSCO prior to Cherry Creek's decision. And the debate over such curriculum issues isn't limited to this one Colorado district, says the Thomas More Society. The firm says it has been contacted by parents in other states about related abuses in school "comprehensive" sex-ed programs.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

When my pastor starts talking politics from the pulpit, I ...

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

Mexico Beach residents return home again _ some to no home
Orange County, California's diversity emboldens Democrats
Montana Senate race awash in outside money as Trump returns
Japan exports fall in September, first decline since 2016
Trump asks Turkey for audio, video evidence on Khashoggi
Senate Democrats skip hearing amid post-Kavanaugh tensions
Heitkamp: Staffer out after ad that named victims

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Soros-backed group fires operative after arrest over alleged battery against GOP campaign manager
State trying to silence pastor upset over abortion for 13-year-old
Pow! Wow! Warren deals blow to affirmative action
School won’t say what’s in its ‘LGBTQ Sex Education’ workshop
Mississippi shows need for transparency around civil forfeiture

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Teachers, unions strike for money, power at kids' expense

Teacher's deskStriking public school teachers in Oregon contend that they are prepared to picket for weeks – if that is what it takes to secure higher wages for themselves at the expense of students’ education.