Will Calif. court allow reexamination of voter signatures?

Friday, April 11, 2014
 | 
Becky Yeh - California correspondent (OneNewsNow.com)

A court hearing today could determine the fate of a California initiative to overturn what's come to be known as the state's "transgender bathroom law."

The Sacramento Superior Court will consider whether counties in California must hand over more than 130,000 rejected signatures from an initiative to overturn AB 1266, which was to have taken effect January 1. Privacy for All Students, the coalition that is seeking to place the law before California voters, says signatures were rejected by counties across the state and many were wrongly disqualified.

Brad Dacus, president of Pacific Justice Institute, says today's hearing is very important.

Dacus, Brad (PJI)"This is yet another attempt by the secretary of state to deprive voters of their fundamental rights," he tells OneNewsNow. "It is outrageous that the state wants to avoid all accountability even when referendum signatures are wrongfully invalidated."

The coalition filed suit after the secretary of state announced the referendum fell short of the required number of signatures. Proponents said they collected more than the required 600,000 signatures to qualify the referendum, but the secretary of state's office noted proponents fell more than 100,000 signatures short.

"We are not going to let this happen without a fight," replies Dacus. "No state or county official is above the law."

The law allows students, regardless of their biological sex, to self-select facilities and activities based on the gender with which they identify – not on their God-given gender. The case is going before Judge Timothy Frawley.

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