Discriminatory policy jeopardizes homeschool grad's scholarship

Saturday, September 3, 2016
 | 
Michael F. Haverluck (OneNewsNow.com)

No admittance signAn Alabama community college put a homeschool graduate’s scholarship at risk when it notified her that she had to go above and beyond normal requirements because she was educated at home.

The graduate was informed by her local community college that she would most likely not be able to attend school this fall due to a policy adopted by the Alabama Community College System Board of Trustees (ACCSBT), which it alleged precluded her from moving forward with her coursework – a turn of events that could have ultimately forced her to lose full-tuition scholarship.

Not so fast …

The Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) asserted that before the institution for higher learning discovered that the student was homeschooled, she did not have to meet any additional requirements.

“When the graduate first applied for admission, she received a welcome letter, took the COMPASS test and was told she would not need to take the ACT,” HSLDA reports. “She was also awarded a full-ride scholarship, contingent upon her beginning school this fall and maintaining a satisfactory GPA.”

The former homeschooler, with her record of academic excellence, believed that everything appeared to be falling into place and that her undergraduate career was well under way – but this did not turn out to be the case.

“However, when the college discovered the graduate had been homeschooled, an admissions official called to explain that ‘state law’ required her to take the ACT,” the Christian nonprofit legal organization informed.

Appealing to the law

Once the student saw what she was up against, she proceeded to seek legal help in order to clear things up and salvage her scholarship.

“After verifying the family’s compliance with Alabama homeschool law, HSLDA Legal Assistant Daniel Davis pointed out to the family that state law contains a provision specifically prohibiting colleges from discriminating against an otherwise qualified student based on the fact that the student was homeschooled,” the Purcellville, Virginia-based group announced.

When everything was brought to the community college’s attention, officials at the school attempted to say that the matter was not in their hands and that they were simply following standard protocol.

“The college contended that their hands were tied by a policy established by the Alabama Community College System Board of Trustees,” HSLDA Staff Attorney Dan Beasley explained. “In light of Alabama’s anti-discrimination provision, HSLDA contacted the board and asked them to clarify the policy.”

Problem solved

Things were quickly resolved once the legal experts brought the matter to the ACCSBT’s attention.

“[A]n ACT or SAT score is no longer a requirement for general admission to an Alabama Community College System institution,” the board responded to the legal group.

With the homeschool grad’s weakened physical condition at the time, the clarification and resolution was greatly welcomed.

“This news came as a relief, because earlier in the spring, the student had fallen and suffered a concussion, which led to a doctor’s order to take a break from studying, reading and testing,” Beasley added. “So even if she had wanted to comply with the college's discriminatory requirements, her present medical condition prevented her from taking an arduous exam such as the ACT.”

Once school officials were notified about their errant interpretation of the admission process, they were quick to rectify the situation in the homeschool graduate’s favor.

“Ultimately, armed with HSLDA’s information about state law, the family contacted the college again, and their daughter was accepted and treated as eligible to receive her full-tuition scholarship,” Beasley shared. “She has since begun classes.”

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

Grade the mainstream media on its treatment of the events that took place in Charlottesville, VA

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

100 gas tanks: Extremists in Spain planned massive attack
Police say 39 people detained over neo-Nazi march in Berlin
Iraq launches operation to take back IS-held town near Mosul
Merkel ally drops call for cap on refugees entering Germany
Comedian, civil rights activist Dick Gregory dies
Suspect in killings of 2 Fla. officers arrested at bar
'Free speech rally' cut short after massive counterprotest
Colleges grappling with balancing free speech, campus safety

LATEST FROM THE WEB

NKorea warns of 'merciless strike' ahead of US-SKorea drills
Gohmert: During the campaign, Paul Ryan told us to 'keep President Hillary Clinton accountable'
3 vans linked to Barcelona terror attack suspect located, Spanish police say
Liberal lawyer says left's Russia-Trump obsession is like Stalin and KGB
Boston strong? Antifa thugs assault flag-waving woman

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Obergefell ruling ruled us all 'illogical'

Jim ObergefellA family court judge told a religious group it's the U.S. Supreme Court, not the states, that are behaving irrationally over the legal definition of marriage.