Kansas' most important pro-life case

Monday, March 20, 2017
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

abortion activists protestingPro-life groups in The Sunflower State are concerned a radical ruling by the state Supreme Court might upend all pro-life laws passed by the legislature.

A father/daughter abortion team filed suit to block implementation of the Kansas ban on dismemberment abortions, and the case has been heard by the state Supreme Court. Kathy Ostrowski of Kansans for Life was there and tells OneNewsNow most of the judges seemed more than amenable to the idea that the state constitution contains a right to abortion.

"It looked like they were salivating to create a right to abortion," she laments. "Unfortunately, I'm sad to report only one justice, Caleb Stegall, probed the inconsistencies with the history of Kansas laws and our Constitution."

The Kansas Constitution, which was written about a century and a half ago, contains a right to life but no right to abortion, so to establish the latter, Ostrowski says, the justices would basically have to create one out of the air. Of equal concern is the impact such a radical activist ruling would have on the Kansas pro-life movement.

"Most of our laws, they would probably be challenged in court," the pro-lifer says. "Our laws in Kansas, our pro-life laws, are constitutional under the Roe v. Wade so-called right to abortion, but how they would pass scrutiny under a state right, a radically extreme state right, is very frightening."

Ostrowski concludes that everything is at stake, and she calls this the most important pro-life case ever argued in Kansas courts.

Meanwhile, a proposal in Kansas is intended to convince the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion.

KS amendment pushes to revisit Roe v. Wade

It's been a long journey, but Donna Lipholdt of Culture Shield Kansas says a proposed Personhood Amendment to the state constitution will finally get a committee hearing.

"We've been trying to get a hearing for seven years," Lipholdt tells OneNewsNow, "and so we're very excited that this year, we are getting a hearing, and we're going to be testifying as to the humanity of the unborn and those little baby boys and girls who need to be given the same constitutional rights that all of us are given as adults."

If the resolution is passed, Kansas voters will get to vote on the amendment and agree with what science says: that life begins at conception.

"God created these [babies], and it's just that they're in a different place than we are," says Lipholdt. "They're in the womb, and we're out of the womb and we're protected. So it doesn't make any sense for them not to be protected the same way."

If passed, the Kansas amendment could set the stage for a legal challenge sending the issue back to the U.S. Supreme Court, where as early as 1973, the justices said that if someone could prove the unborn baby is a person, abortion proponents would have a very hard time making a case.

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