SPLC challenges funding of charter schools

Thursday, April 20, 2017
 | 
Bob Kellogg (OneNewsNow.com)

classroom scene 2A lawsuit against Mississippi filed by the Southern Poverty Law Center threatens the future of that state's charter schools, but a defense attorney believes state funding for the schools is constitutional.

The SPLC contends the state's constitution – specifically, sections 206 and 208 – doesn't allow property taxes to be used for public charter schools. Mike Hurst, director of the Mississippi Justice Institute, argues just the opposite is true: that the constitution clearly authorizes the funding of charter schools with tax dollars.

"The Mississippi Constitution authorizes these schools and it specifically authorizes local tax dollars to follow local school children to the public schools that they attend," he says. "I think that at the end of the day, justice will prevail [and] these kids will be allowed to continue to attend charter public schools."

Section 206 of the Mississippi Constitution created a state education trust fund and allows local districts to levy property taxes; and Section 208 requires state funds to go to what are termed "free schools."

Hurst, who is representing several charter school parents, told the Clarion-Ledger in early April that the SPLC destroyed its own case during arguments in the case:

"I think when the SPLC admitted that the other types of public schools [the Mississippi School of Math and Science, for example] we have around the state – and that the Mississippi Legislature has authorized to receive both state and local funding – are constitutional, I don't see how they can argue that public charter schools are unconstitutional. They are the same type of setup. It's a contradiction in their argument.”

The attorney doubts the case will make it to trial.

"I think the judge heard the legal arguments; I think there are no factual issues between the parties; and frankly, I think the judge will rule on the motion – and whichever party is not satisfied will appeal to the next level," he offers.

Hinds County Chancery Court Judge Dewayne Thomas has set May 10 for proposed findings and June 21 for any required rebuttals.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What will you remember most about evangelist Billy Graham?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

NRA accuses gun-control advocates of exploiting FL shooting
Trump says raise age for buying assault rifles, defying NRA
Sheriff: School officer never went inside to confront gunman
US women headed for worst figure skating finish in Olympics
Shelters open amid Midwest flooding as rivers keep rising
Sleepwalking student causes school to cancel classes
Much-touted MS-13 sweep keeps even most basic details secret

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Months before massacre, Florida shooter’s host family told cops he had threatened people with a gun
Missouri Governor Eric Greitens indicted on invasion of privacy charge
Rev. Billy Graham to lie in honor at U.S. Capitol rotunda
Gross and despicable: Teen Vogue’s Lauren Duca rips ‘evil’ Rev. Billy Graham: ‘Have fun in hell’
Brave New Schools: Harvard ripped for choosing 'white male' as next prez

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Trump vows to fight but bureaucracy vows to block

judge banging gavelA former U.S. Justice Department attorney says it won't be so easy for the Trump-led DOJ to defeat a federal judge's order that blocked the President's plan to withhold funds from "sanctuary cities."