No nuts about it ... a squirrel can be a good example

Monday, December 9, 2013
 | 
Russ Jones (OneNewsNow.com)

A children's author hopes her books about a rambunctious but caring squirrel can have a positive influence on a generation that often demonstrates an inability to interact with and care for others, as directed by scripture.

Most parents want their children to grow up to be responsible and generous individuals. Giving them the opportunities to help out around the house with chores or simple tasks, such as cooking dinner or folding laundry, plants these seeds of independence and reliability.

Stephanie Rach-Wilson with bookAuthor and creator of "Let's Go Chipper" – Stephanie Rach-Wilson – continues her series with Helping Hands, a rhyme-filled story bringing Chipper the squirrel and his nature-friends together to learn about the importance of helping out around the home and community and being a supportive friend.

"Chipper's adventures are all about connecting with his friends and always being ready to meet other friends," she shares. "And Chipper is a squirrel, so by nature they are curious, adventurous; they are little thrill-seekers. So I look at that same spirit being infused into kids, which is relevant to their own lives. So ... when they're done flipping the pages, it generally excites them to go outside and do something with their own friends."

The current generation is the first that doesn't know what it's like to exist without a mobile device, color television, or the Internet. Rach-Wilson believes the "Let's Go Chipper" series helps fight back against some of those current influences that take away from personal interaction.

"When it comes to the 'me, me, me,' it's acknowledging that a child might want something, but let's see how we can work together to get it," the author explains. "And the earlier you start, the better. It's definitely something that you can confirm in a child when they're young, and you can help recalibrate a child at any age by just switching the way you communicate with them."

Rach-Wilson says making opportunities for children to play and interact with their peers and siblings will help them learn to communicate and hone their interpersonal skills for years to come – important skills for whatever they later do in life.

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