An upside to the president's postponement

Monday, July 17, 2017
 | 
Bill Bumpas (OneNewsNow.com)

SudanA spokesman for a persecution watchdog organization sees both good and bad in President Trump's postponing for another three months a decision on whether to lift U.S. sanctions on Sudan.

Isaac Six, advocacy director for International Christian Concern (ICC), tells OneNewsNow the good news is that a decision was not made to permanently lift sanctions -- something the Sudanese government has been pushing for very strongly in recent months. But at the same time, Six is disappointed because his organization was hoping for a definitive decision allowing the sanctions to remain in place.

He does not believe there have been improvements in the areas of human rights and religious freedom.

"We're talking about a country that has already completely restricted the building of new churches," he points out. "They argue there's not really any Christians here anyway, so you don't need new churches. And now they're working on destroying the few churches that remain and forcing Christians in Sudan to go underground."

Six says the U.S. needs to be given access to monitor the situation.

"Sudan is very restrictive. They don't allow U.S. officials into the Nuba Mountain area, for instance, and other areas, so we can't really monitor and tell what's going on there without being allowed in," the advocacy director reports. "So I think we really need to hold off on relieving these sanctions until we know there's actually been improvements and not just take at face value whatever the Sudanese government is telling us."

In the next three months, Six hopes ICC can continue to convince members of Congress and the Trump administration to carefully review the situation before permanently relieving sanctions on Sudan.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What's the big hold-up in 'draining the swamp'?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

GOP sets Senate health care vote buoyed by McCain return
Trump asks about firing Sessions, calls his position 'weak'
Evangelical leaders rally around Kushner amid Russia probe
Immigrants wept, pleaded for water and pounded on the truck
Israel removes metal detectors from holy site entrance
In Google vs. the EU, a $2.7B fine could just be the start

LATEST FROM THE WEB

The truth about Southern black slave owners
The islamophobia industry killed Justine Damond
Sarah Huckabee Sanders called "butch queen" by Daily Beast writer and the left is silent
Post-Christian America: Gullible, intolerant, and superstitious
College official: Drop algebra requirement because minorities keep failing it

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Middle East carnage gives State Dept. amnesia

Yazidi victim site (Iraq)In the latest example of the need to drain the D.C. swamp, the U.S. State Department is refusing to use the word "genocide" to describe the Islamic State's barbaric march across the Middle East.