President's uncle continues to defy deportation

Wednesday, December 19, 2012
 | 
Chad Groening (OneNewsNow.com)

An immigration reform organization says it's not surprising that President Barack Obama's uncle -- who has been in the U.S. illegally for 20 years -- has been given another hearing in order to avoid deportation back to Kenya.

Onyango Obama was arrested in Framington, Massachusetts, in August 2011 after he nearly crashed his SUV into a police patrol car and then insisted that the officer should have given way to him.  A breathalyzer test showed Obama had a blood alcohol content over the legal limit. He was subsequently charged with driving under the influence, driving to endanger, and failing to use a turn signal.

Now the Boston Globe has reported that, despite that arrest, the Board of Immigration Appeals has granted Obama a new deportation hearing. He had been ordered in the Spring to report to Immigration and Customs enforcement in order to effectuate his departure from the United States.

Mehlman, Ira (Federation for American Immigration Reform)Ira Mehlman, spokesman for the Federation for American Immigration Reform, says Obama's case is indicative of what generally goes on in the immigration system.

"While this is an egregious case -- and a high-profile case, because the person in question happens to be the president's uncle -- it is not unusual," he tells OneNewsNow.

"It happens all the time, and it's precisely the problem with our immigration system that there is never any finality. People understand that if you can just drag it out long enough, eventually you'll get your way."

Onyango Obama has been illegally in the United States since 1992 when he was originally ordered to leave after he overstayed his visa.

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