Soda tax short-lived in Windy City – or is it?

Thursday, October 12, 2017
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

soft drinksChicago's tax on sugary beverages may have gone flat, but don't expect the idea to go away anytime soon.

Following a dispute between the soda industry, public health advocates, and city officials, a Cook County board committee voted 15-2 Wednesday to can Chicago's penny-per-ounce tax on sugary drinks.

"A lot of people are, I think, rightfully saying that this shows that the soda tax is wildly unpopular – but I don't think those of us who prefer not being taxed on the foods that we eat because the government doesn't want us to eat them should rest on our laurels," says New York City resident Jeff Stier of the National Center for Public Policy Research.

The tax was intended to raise additional revenue and help fill budget gaps. However, people concerned about obesity saw it as a way to encourage better choices.

Stier

"This was an initiative sponsored by my former mayor, Michael Bloomberg," Stier adds. "He put millions of dollars into it. He's got more to spend – and I think he will."

Soda has been blamed for obesity, although many individuals, think tanks, and special interest groups dispute that say there are many factors at play. Meanwhile, Stier and other critics of soda taxes say they hurt poor people more than anyone else.

The tax, which took effect August 2, will officially end December 1.

Consider Supporting Us?

The staff at Onenewsnow.com strives daily to bring you news from a biblical perspective. If you benefit from this platform and want others to know about it please consider a generous gift today.

MAKE A DONATION

Comments

We moderate all reader comments, usually within 24 hours of posting (longer on weekends). Please limit your comment to 300 words or less and ensure it addresses the article - NOT another reader's comments. Comments that contain a link (URL), an inordinate number of words in ALL CAPS, rude remarks directed at other readers, or profanity/vulgarity will not be approved. More details

SIGN UP FOR OUR DAILY NEWSBRIEF

SUBSCRIBE

VOTE IN OUR POLL

What are two major benefits of tough border laws in the U.S.?

CAST YOUR VOTE

GET PUSH NOTIFICATIONS

SUBSCRIBE

LATEST AP HEADLINES

1 dead, dozens of hostages freed after L.A. standoff
Inspector warned duck boat company of design flaws last year
Kavanaugh: Watergate tapes decision may have been wrong
'Wonder Woman,' 'Aquaman' and 'Shazam!' thrill Comic-Con
Democratic socialism surging in the age of Trump
Hamas accepts cease-fire after massive Israeli Gaza strikes
Revelations of US cardinal sex abuse will force pope's hand

LATEST FROM THE WEB

Suspect in custody, at least 1 dead, after standoff at Trader Joe's in LA, police say
Ohio sees sharp increase in complications from so-called abortion pill
America's classified secrets system 'unsustainable'
Duck boat victims include 9 from one family, ship's driver, tourists
Tornado stuns Iowa town but residents say they'll rebuildl

CARTOON OF THE DAY

Cartoon of the Day

REASON & COMPANY

NEXT STORY
Kasich 2020: Pro-immigration, pro-environment, anti-nationalism

John KasichGov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) believes the third time’s a charm as he reportedly strategizes for a White House run on the GOP ticket for 2020, and he’s adopting a campaign platform right out of the Democratic Party’s playbook – complete with open immigration and climate change alarmism as its hallmarks, while moving away from nationalism.