Euthanasia's goals: save money, collect organs

Monday, February 6, 2017
 | 
Charlie Butts (OneNewsNow.com)

stethoscope and cashA situation in Canada should send a clear message to 25 U.S. states considering doctor-assisted suicide.

Two years ago, Canada's Supreme Court legalized assisted suicide and there are hints that the country has moved toward devaluing human life.

Alex Schadenberg of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition tells OneNewsNow a January 23 survey suggests that assisted suicide has had savings of up to $138 million a year for the government.

“Now considering the cost problems that we have with healthcare in Canada,” he tells OneNewsNow, “this is one more carrot before the people in order to now say, Well euthanasia's not only going to cause the deaths of people who supposedly are asking for it but on top of that, it's a social good because it saves money.’”

The savings is being compared to the cost of quality medical care, including pain management.

Just a few weeks ago, a study was released on the possibility of organs being donated from victims of euthanasia. 

Schadenberg

“And so now you have the whole mixed up stew where we're talking about organ donation euthanasia and saving money for the health care system from euthanasia, and somehow this is going to be controlled?” he asks.

The true issue is about doctors having the legal right to kill their patients, he warns "and it will soon be out of control in our country as well if we don't start turning the corner [to decide against euthanasia] soon.”

The countries in Europe that have legalized euthanasia have seen a similar abuse of euthanasia. In the Netherlands, a woman with dementia changed her mind about accepting doctor-assisted suicide but was forcibly held down while the doctor went ahead with the lethal drug.

Schadenberg contends the only way to avoid that kind of downward spiral in the U.S. is to not legalize euthanasia to begin with. 

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