Companies using feds to sell their 'green' wares?

Wednesday, September 13, 2017
 | 
Chris Woodward (OneNewsNow.com)

car dealership lotAmericans will gather in Washington, D.C., on Thursday to discuss energy efficiency, but not everyone believes that conservation is a federal responsibility.

The gathering in the nation’s capital is in observation of Great Energy Efficiency Day (GEED).

Launched in 2004, GEED has become a "must-attend" public dialogue on the need for – and benefits of – energy efficiency. It is also a chance for congressional staffers to learn about the far-reaching benefits of energy efficiency through expert-led panels with stakeholders from business, industry and government.

The Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) is one of the sponsors of the annual event.

ASE has stated that United States Congress and the Trump administration have proposed deep cuts to federal energy efficiency programs such as Energy Star and appliance standards, asserting that it is more important than ever to be engaged in shaping policy in Washington.

"This year's second Great Energy Efficiency Day forum – Victories and Opportunities in the Federal Efficiency Program Landscape – will highlight how current policy and program infrastructure has successfully improved efficiency and the economy, as well as the opportunities for improvement moving forward," the energy conservation group announced.

Two expert-led panels are slated to discuss the following topics: (1) An Investment That Delivers: Federal Energy Efficiency Programs at Work and (2) Missed Opportunities: Gaps in the Policy Landscape.

According to Conservative Review contributor, Tom Borelli, this event is one simply an industry effort to use the federal government to mandate sales of their products.

"I don't think there is a role of the federal government to be mandating energy efficiency standards for appliances or things of that nature," Borelli contended. "Saving energy is a great idea. Saving energy can lead to cost savings by consumers, and that's all well and good, but it should be left up to the companies themselves to design the incentives for people to buy their products."

Confirmed speakers for "Great Energy Efficiency Day, Part II" include Brita Gross of General Motors and Maria Vargas at the U.S. Department of Energy.

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